It all starts with an idea

Still into reducing my stash, i came up with the idea to make a baby cardigan in knitting and crochet. Basing it on a basic pattern, i already had, for the measurements. The material i used for the testing model is 100% acrylic yarn.


Then the hard part started.... I have lots of trouble with math and calculations, so making it work was a real challenge!


The basic pattern size 74.


As you can see, i made several mistakes dividing the triangles evenly, as usual there was some frogging:)


The gauge, there were some difficulties as well, i tend to knit my gauge with normal tension, but when knitting along, my stitches get wider, the gauge doesn't apply any more. I have struggled with that a lot in the past, but now i have found the solution, i just knit the gauge with far less tension. Another solution is to knit with needles, that are one size bigger.

The knitting stitches are stocking stitch, the crochet is Tunesian, in Dutch it's called Honeycomb stitch. The decorative stitches along the triangles and top are an elevated single crochet, the hem on the bottom and sleeves are crocheted with a crabstitch.

This is the result.


The front


The back


Detail of the combination of stitches

I wrote most of the pattern down, intending to make it available, but it's almost impossible to describe how i crochet the parts together, because there's some cheating involved. The parts don't always have the same amount of stitches to connect, and it's a very visual thing to do. Mostly i make it up as it goes. I wouldn't know how to write that down, so that someone else understands, what i mean.

4 comments:

  1. Goed werk! Allow me to gush over the gussets on this darling sweater: they are magnif! :) I wanted to put some in a sweater for my elderly mother, but never could figure out how to insert them, hence chucked the idea. So, if I understand correctly, you attached them from the right side using crochet, right?

    Impressed,

    Needleclicker

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    Replies
    1. Yes, i used surface chains, pulling through both parts, the knitted first, then the crocheted part. This way you get a nice surface embellishment, with the attaching perk to go with:)

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  2. OK, one other question, though: when I have crocheted pieces together from the right side, the chain is always over on one side, instead of on the top. How did you get them to lie so perfectly on top? (I'm envious {grin}.)

    Needleclicker

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I practicly always use just the top loops, that way it stays in the middle. Hope this makes sense....

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